Humanizing the "Baby's mama"

Writing for NPR, Gene Demby says smart things about the now-defunct reality show, "All My Babies' Mamas'":

One of the odd side effects of many reality shows — even those shows meant to paint their subjects as ridiculous or distasteful — is that they can humanize their stars. Here Comes Honey Boo Boo's detractors are myriad, and they often single out the disdain the producers seem to take toward the Thompsons, the family at the its center. But the show's fans point out that that disdain (which is nakedly class-based) is undercut by the fact that the Thompsons are affirming toward each other and actually kind of boringly level-headed about their strange notoriety. [...]

If unconventional families — polygamists, huge broods, marginal celebrities — are a staple of the reality show genre, Babies' Mamas would seem to fit neatly within those parameters. What if the show's subjects were mostly concerned with mundane stuff like carpooling logistics and dance rehearsals? Isn't it possible that Babies' Mamas could have also granted some humanity to real baby's mamas and complicated some simplistic, ugly stereotypes about them?