water street in charlottesville

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To take this, I went to the top of the Water Street parking garage. The photo was taken at sunset, and I did minimal editing after scanning the film. This is likely the first of many such photos, my attempts to capture Charlottesville from a somewhat different vantage point. I’ll probably take additional photos from this vantage point, given the opportunities provided by the Farmer’s Market, which is held in that parking lot, and the view from the various sides of the garage.

Camera: Intrepid 4x5 | Lens: Nikkor-W 210mm f/5.6 | Film: Kodak Portra 160.

cove presbyterian church

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From Wikipedia:

Cove Presbyterian Church, also known as Cove Meeting House and Rich Cove, is a historic Presbyterian church located at Covesville, Albemarle County, Virginia. It was built in 1809 and a is a one-story, rectangular one-room, brick building. The building was rebuilt and renovated in 1880 after it was destroyed by a tornado

Camera: Intrepid 4x5 | Lens: Nikkor-W 210mm f/5.6 | Film: Kodak Portra 160.

another car show

I have no interest in owning or restoring a classic car, but I’m fascinated by the cars themselves. Charlottesville recently hosted a classic car show and I took a few photos to document the event and give some real use to my (new to me) Intrepid view camera and Fuji 125mm lens. None of these are particularly interesting or artistic, but as I look at them, they are inspiration for the next time I photograph cars, when I will try to get a little interesting or artistic.

Kodak Tri-X 320

Kodak Tri-X 320

Kodak Tri-X 320 

Kodak Tri-X 320 

Kodak Portra 160

Kodak Portra 160

Kodak Portra 160 

Kodak Portra 160 

Kodak Portra 160 

Kodak Portra 160 

Kodak Portra 160 

Kodak Portra 160 

cheap film and expensive lenses

I'm constantly traveling in and out of Union Station in D.C., which means I'm constantly taking photos of Union Station. My last visit I was trying out a new lens—the Voigtlander Ultron 28mm f/2.0—and ended up shooting most of a roll of film—Kodak Ultramax 400—while making my way back to Charlottesville. I got it developed by the local camera shop in town, and scanned the negatives at home. The images themselves aren't terribly strong, but I like the how the lens renders color, and I'm a fan of the somewhat-wider-than-normal perspective.

I'm moving away from medium format film—something I may write about in the future—and I've picked up two new lenses for my Leica as I move to shoot more 35mm (and large format). This is the first, I'll write about the second soon enough.

The entrance to Union Station.

The entrance to Union Station.

One of the unused entrances to the station. 

One of the unused entrances to the station. 

Inside the station. 

Inside the station. 

I only shot most of the roll at Union Station. A few were taken near the White House, where I could see how the lens performed close up and at somewhat of a distance.

These people were arguing about the Constitution.

These people were arguing about the Constitution.

Lafayette!

Lafayette!

I finished the roll in Charlottesville, with a few photos of a graffiti-ed tunnel near downtown. This also gave me a chance to see how it performed up-close.

Based on a few context clues, I think this was all spray-painted by local students.

Based on a few context clues, I think this was all spray-painted by local students.

An apt statement these days.

An apt statement these days.

There's a little fall-off in the corners of the frame, but otherwise it is very sharp.

There's a little fall-off in the corners of the frame, but otherwise it is very sharp.